FOP


On Change #4: Mobile Huts
02.24.2014, 5:04 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

shantiesphotos Eric William Carroll via the Walker Art Center

We’re continuing research on what it means to inhabit change. We’re particularly interested ephemeral structures that provide shelter while being responsive to changes unfolding in the surrounding environment.

This week we learned about two notable projects. First, the Art Shanties project in Minnesota. Here, artists have created upbeat and wildly different reinterpretations of the traditional fishing shacks that dot frozen lakes in Minnesota every winter. The Art Shanties encourage community among frozen lake fishermen and art-lovers.

Also notable are two architectural models of a historic three-by-three square meter hut at Kyoto’s Shigamo Shrine. Both huts refer to Kamono Chomei’s home. The Japanese recluse immortalized his tiny house in a famous piece of literature written over 800 years ago called the Hōjōki  (translated as “An Account of My Hut”). If you’re not familiar with this ancient work, one highlight reads:

I leave my span of days for Heaven to determine, neither clinging to life nor begrudging its end. My body is like a drifting cloud—I ask for nothing, I want nothing. My greatest joy is a quiet nap; my only desire for this life is to see the beauties of the seasons.” - from, An Account of My Hut, by Kamo no Chomei in 1212, translated by Donald Keene.

Chomei intended for his hut to be mobile and enable him to relocate in response to the volatile political events in Japan that were affecting his life.  A traditional model of the house has graced the Kyoto shrine for some time.  This past winter, Japanese architect Kengo Kuma offered an ephemeral, modern interpretation, also located on the shrine’s grounds.  It’s composed of cedar, magnets and plastic sheeting.

hutsChomei’s hut by Kengo Kuma (image by Rei Niwa) and the Shrine’s original model of the hut with an oversized protective roof (image via GreenShinto.com)


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